The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale
The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale_top

Description

Product Description

Available together in one volume for the first time, the three novels of Cormac McCarthy''s award-winning and bestselling Border Trilogy constitute a genuine American epic.

 

Beginning with All the Pretty Horses and continuing through The Crossing and Cities of the Plain, McCarthy chronicles the lives of two young men coming of age in the Southwest and Mexico, poised on the edge of a world about to change forever. Hauntingly beautiful, filled with sorrow and humor, The Border Trilogy is a masterful elegy for the American frontier.

Review

"An American classic to stand with the finest literary achievements of the century." —San Francisco Chronicle

 

"A miracle in prose, an American original." —New York Times Book Review

From the Inside Flap

Available together in one volume for the first time, the three novels of Cormac
McCarthy''s award-winning and bestselling Border Trilogy constitute a genuine
American epic.

Beginning with All the Pretty Horses and continuing through The
Crossing
and Cities of the Plain, McCarthy chronicles the lives of two
young men coming of age in the Southwest and Mexico, poised on the edge of a
world about to change forever.  Hauntingly beautiful, filled with sorrow and
humor, The Border Trilogy is a masterful elegy for the American frontier.

From the Back Cover

Available together in one volume for the first time, the three novels of Cormac
McCarthy''s award-winning and bestselling Border Trilogy constitute a genuine
American epic.
Beginning with All the Pretty Horses and continuing through The
Crossing and Cities of the Plain, McCarthy chronicles the lives of two
young men coming of age in the Southwest and Mexico, poised on the edge of a
world about to change forever. Hauntingly beautiful, filled with sorrow and
humor, The Border Trilogy is a masterful elegy for the American frontier.

About the Author

Cormac McCarthy is the author of The Orchard Keeper, Outer Dark, Child of God, Suttree, and Blood Meridian. All the Pretty Horses, the first volume of The Border Trilogy, won the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
593 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

FoxMan2099
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
High Quality Volume
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2019
For the me three novels are unquestionably 5/5, but this review is more about this particular edition. It is a high quality, clothbound hardcover with a well made dust jacket. The paper is high quality and the print / font is perfect. It''s big but not giant, too, so you can... See more
For the me three novels are unquestionably 5/5, but this review is more about this particular edition. It is a high quality, clothbound hardcover with a well made dust jacket. The paper is high quality and the print / font is perfect. It''s big but not giant, too, so you can read it without it being unwieldy. This is THE edition to have. Great price point since you''re getting all three books. 5 / 5, very easy rating to give.
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Randolph Severson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Monumental Achievement In American Literature
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2020
Border Crossings is a Trilogy of breath-taking grandeur, heart-stopping beauty and heart-breaking events. The grandeur is in the massive scope and reach of the work, the beautiful is in the lyrical descriptions of earth and sky, of high country and endless horizons and the... See more
Border Crossings is a Trilogy of breath-taking grandeur, heart-stopping beauty and heart-breaking events. The grandeur is in the massive scope and reach of the work, the beautiful is in the lyrical descriptions of earth and sky, of high country and endless horizons and the occasional grace residing in the beliefs and habits of ordinary men living outsized and anachronistic lives. The heartbreak is in events random, tragic in their unfolding, very often violent or grotesque. The story is set in the Old Southwest and Mexico, the Spanish Conquest — McCarthy’s frequent and sometimes exasperated use of untranslated Spanish a reminder the ghosts walk in the beautiful and often desolate country he describes, that it was Spanish before it was American, and before Spanish ..... It’s about modern day Cowboys, John Grady Cole and Billy Parham, who retain in their outlook and habits, in their laconic and emotionally threaded speech, the Old Ways, who collide with human evil and the indifference of a world speeding past them like a car on the highway speeding past two galloping riders. The outcome isn’t pretty. It’s dramatic, desolate, dark. This is a monumental book and a monumental achievement in American Letters. It’s not an easy read nor an entertaining one but if you stay with it immerses you in a story that cleaves to the bedrock and bleakness of the human condition with a truthfulness akin to Homer, especially the Homer of Priam in the tent of Achilles — more truthfulness, perhaps, than in any other novel you’ll ever read, Hawthorne, Melville, Faulkner, Toni Morrison not excluded. It’s a world in which evil abides, a world in which you can’t trust anybody. You can trust only one thing: the stubborn tenacity of the human will to survive and upon occasion overreach itself in acts of grace, nobility, honor, kindness and love. Breath-taking.....
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C. M Mills
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Border Trilogy of Cormac McCarthy is a modern America classic of the 20th century American West
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2021
Cormac McCarthy was born in Providence Rhode Island in 1932. He has lived in Texas and Knoxville Tennessee among other cities. He is one of our greatest American novelist whose writing bears the influence of such masters as William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. His prose... See more
Cormac McCarthy was born in Providence Rhode Island in 1932. He has lived in Texas and Knoxville Tennessee among other cities. He is one of our greatest American novelist whose writing bears the influence of such masters as William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. His prose is taut and laconic as he knows well the speech patterns of cowboys living in New Mexico and on the Mexican border. He is most known for his Blood Meridian and No Country for Old Men and The Road his apocalyptic novel of a father and son. However this trio of novels published in a beautiful edition by Everyman Press was my first experience reading him. The book contains all three works and runs to a little over 1000 pages. The novels are:
All the Pretty Horses-Young teenager John Grady Cole''s family horses are stolen and he and his brother Boyd travel to Mexico in order to find them. Along they way they meet a boy named Blevins. What ensues are beautifully lush descriptions of the harsh Mexican landscapes, violence and tragedy. A great novel.
The Crossing-Billy Parham is a teenager who rescues a wild female wolf from a trap., He decides to return her to her home in Mexico. He is joined by his younger brother Boyd. In Mexico the boys encounter women, Mexican natives who share their life philosophy and murder. A grim sober saga of American during the World War II years.
Cities of the Plain-Billy Parham and John Grady Cole are working together on a ranch, The novel focuses on the abilities of Grady to break horses and his tragic love affair with a young Mexican prostitute.
The novels contain a good deal of Spanish language dialogue and the author does not follow standard punctuation. His novels are beautifully written though and he stands tall as a great American author.
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Sir Charles Panther
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"The Immappable World of Our Journey"
Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2014
"The task of the narrator is not an easy one . . ." And so I continue to work my way slowly through McCarthy''s brilliance. There is no order or plan to my approach: I just take them as they come to me, as the quoted title advises. This is a reader''s... See more
"The task of the narrator is not an easy one . . ."

And so I continue to work my way slowly through McCarthy''s brilliance. There is no order or plan to my approach: I just take them as they come to me, as the quoted title advises.

This is a reader''s dream, 1,020 hard-bound pages, with an embroidered gold satin placekeeper. This is a book to keep and treasure, that you will read again, and that you will want to pass on (ideally to a son), maybe adding your own note to the lovely dedication, almost hidden in the back pages.

My father, dead three years now, read Louis L''Amour voraciously his entire life. From a teenager to a 75-year-old man, it was the same books, over and over. He never spoke of the west, of cowboys or gunfights or life on the range, but his unending flight there told me. I don''t know what drew him, what he was missing in his life as an Army officer or husband or father. Maybe freedom, possibility, or just predictable simplicity.

McCarthy''s three books in this trilogy belie this assumed simplicity. The characters are simple, unassuming, honest, hard-working people to whom horrible things happen. Simple choices lead to life-altering events, saving and ending it. "He thought about his life and how little of it he could ever have foreseen and he wondered for all his will and all his intent how much of it was his own doing . . ."

Synopsis: By page 77 in the first book it''s clear: "Somethin bad is goin to happen" [sic] (and we get it again on page 36 of The Crossing). Young John Grady Cole flees to Mexico for work with horses and finds a woman and brutally adult reality in betrayal, pain and death. In the second Billy Parham flees to Mexico and unwittingly saves his own life only to find more cruelty, injustice and death. In the last the now young men find their simple existences just cannot remain so. Through it all is the beautiful, alluring and deadly enigma that is Mexico.

I don''t really care to read about cowboys or horses. I know there are people who dedicate their lives to them and can work magic with them. Such are John Grady Cole and Billy Parham. All the Pretty Horses is clearly McCarthy''s love song to the horse, with the other two novels complementing. If you are a cowboy, these three books are the best thing ever written for and about you.

In all of this is the intimidating wonder of McCarthy''s magnificent writing, his beautiful, attentive descriptions and perfect depiction of movement and action. I will read anything he writes about. Describing a man''s interest in a woman: "The prism-broken light from the chandelier that ran in a river over her naked shoulders . . ." In Blood Meridian I took notice of his description of the night sky, and it came through again and again here, one starry night most certainly not the same as any other, with multitudes of things so subtly different, and therefore McCarthy''s devotion to chronicling just that:

* Constellations "rising up through the phosphorous dark like a sea-net."
* ". . . worlds sprawled in their pale ignitions upon the nameless night . . ."
* ". . . the myriad constellations moving upon the blackness subtly as sealife . . ."
* ". . . the stars in flood above her . . ."
* ". . . the lights of the cities burning on the plain like stars pooled in a lake."
* ". . . the stars which wer belled above them against the eternal blackness of the world''s nativity."

Yes, this collection did make me cry, twice. Both times it came on surprisingly abruptly, despite me knowing what was coming; it just hit me, me in the story and living its depth and presence. Only one book has ever done that before, The Road , and that''s the truth. This is profoundly powerful stuff.

I''ll make my simple complaint again: the Spanish frustrates me intensely. I''m learning it slowly as I read McCarthy''s work, but there is so much I know I''m missing in these passages. McCarthy has put a lot of time and attention into his work, and it pains me that I don''t have the capacity to access this.

Bottom line: ". . . the world was sentient to its core and secret and black beyond men''s imagining . . ." This is a masterful collection, a worthy addition to your library of the greatest literature ever written. These are stories of cowboys and horses and adventure in the dusty Southwest but are so much more, magnificent tales of existence and musing on human purpose and destiny.
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Joyce A Halvorsen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Must in your library
Reviewed in the United States on December 8, 2014
Cormac McCarthy is my favorite author right now. His writings do require some "getting used" to as he refuses to use punctuation except at the end of very long descriptive sentences. And unless you know Tex/Mex or Spanish, which he sprinkles in the narration, be... See more
Cormac McCarthy is my favorite author right now. His writings do require some "getting used" to as he refuses to use punctuation except at the end of very long descriptive sentences. And unless you know Tex/Mex or Spanish, which he sprinkles in the narration, be prepared to either skip over it or better yet look up the meanings. Its the story that he tells, many times brutal and harsh, but the reader is aware that these old timers lives harsh and short lives. The fact that the main characters of "All the Pretty Horses" are only about 13 to 17 years of age and out working on their own at horse ranches and traveling on their own, leads one to recall that many times young men and women in those years lead early working lives and it all ended early too. A man 50 years old was considered aged. The color of McCarthy''s dialog and narration and descriptions of the old west and Mexico leads one to think of some of the greatest writers of the past. Give this Trilogy a chance. There are so many lessons in his book that one can''t stop reading it. This comes in separate books which are handier to read, but I chose the trilogy. The size is not too difficult to hold while reading. The format and printing style is good on the eyes. I am reviewing Everyman''s hardback version. For the extra money get the hardback.
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Mihal Ceittin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cormac deserves a Nobel
Reviewed in the United States on December 17, 2019
The Nobel prize is usually given to people who create a world within their fiction and a unique style to express it. Like Phillip Roth, Pynchon, Robert Stone and Mailer, McCarthy gives us a universe of harsh realities that speak to what is both noble and evil in the... See more
The Nobel prize is usually given to people who create a world within their fiction and a unique style to express it. Like Phillip Roth, Pynchon, Robert Stone and Mailer, McCarthy gives us a universe of harsh realities that speak to what is both noble and evil in the American soul. The Border Trilogy is his most accessible, haunting and epical work. If you care at all about great writing you must read these books.
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Steven M. AnthonyTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Outstanding Prose with Two Caveats
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2012
I ordered this trilogy as a result of having read McCarthy''s The Road and seen No Country For Old Men. The New Mexico/Texas/Mexico border country is the locale for all three of these stories, in the years surrounding the Second World War. The first two are coming of age... See more
I ordered this trilogy as a result of having read McCarthy''s The Road and seen No Country For Old Men. The New Mexico/Texas/Mexico border country is the locale for all three of these stories, in the years surrounding the Second World War. The first two are coming of age adventures featuring young cowboys, while the third brings together the young protagonists of the first two.

In All the Pretty Horses we are introduced to young John Grady Cole, a horse whisperer of sorts who is in the process of being dispossessed of the New Mexico family spread. Along with his friend Lacey Rawlins, Cole lights out for Mexico and adventure. Falling in with a third boy, Jimmy Blevins, acts to bring the trio all the adventure they could ever hope for, most of it of the unwelcome sort.

In The Crossing, we find another New Mexico family. A wolf invades the local range and the Parham family sets out to trap and remove it. Billy Parham, the oldest son, comes upon the trapped, pregnant she wolf and is moved to relocate it back to its Mexican home rather than kill it. Parham crosses back and forth into and out of Mexico in the succeeding three years, ultimately joining forces with his younger brother Boyd. This is a far more tragic tale then the earlier story.

In Cities of the Plain, John Grady Cole and Billy Parham come together as ranch hands on a spread near El Paso. Like The Crossing, this is a sad and depressing tale.

Westerns are not a genre that I have frequently read, though Lonesome Dove is one of my favorite novels. The writing in these three stories is so authentic and haunting in its imagery and descriptiveness as to be stunning. This is some of the best writing I have ever come across, regardless of genre. Magnificent work.

I do have two complaints however, which diminish the work in my eyes considerably, not in the quality of its writing or storytelling, but in my personal reading experience. The first has to do with the very frequent, sometimes extensive Spanish dialogue. Granted, most of the Spanish is very basic, and I was even able at times to figure the gist of the conversations. At others however, entire paragraphs and sometimes as much as a page is consumed with Spanish conversation, sometimes at very key, highly compelling sections of the story. Having taken no Spanish and the book providing no footnotes or translations, what am I to do, go purchase a Spanish/English dictionary or get out of bed and feed the lines into an internet translator? The device certainly lends authenticity to the story, but only to the benefit of McCarthy''s bilingual readers. I cannot for the life of me figure out the decision making process that allowed this.

Secondly, there are several instances throughout the stories where McCarthy engages in very detailed, sometimes technical expositions on highly technical processes. The first that comes to mind is the process by which John Grady Cole saddle breaks wild, untrained colts. The intention is to create a vivid picture in the readers mind. However, McCarthy utilizes terms of art and references tools and equipment which are meaningless to anyone other than either a horseman or a ranch hand. The effect is to dedicate pages of descriptive prose which mean absolutely nothing to the reader. Again, my option is to get out of bed and find a dictionary and then do some research on the internet to get some photos and articles on ropes, knots, halters, bridles and other cowboy equipment that would render the narrative meaningful.

In a nutshell, a highly educated cowboy or ranch hand, fluent in both English and Spanish would likely deem this to be the most magnificent book he''d ever come across, and he''d likely be correct. Failing on both counts, I''m left with 90% of the story being top rate and the other 10% leaving me to scratch my head. Four and a half stars.
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CrankTop Contributor: Rock Music
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lovely edition of the trilogy.
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2021
Definitely the version to get. It''s a solid book, but not too big, and includes the entire trilogy. It''s well put together, solidly bound, with a sheen on outer page lengths. It''s a very nice edition of what some would call modern classics I guess. I wouldn''t probably start... See more
Definitely the version to get. It''s a solid book, but not too big, and includes the entire trilogy. It''s well put together, solidly bound, with a sheen on outer page lengths. It''s a very nice edition of what some would call modern classics I guess. I wouldn''t probably start here with the author, but this is a very good place as any for a new reader. Challenging and authentic. I always learn something from Cormac, and these novels are no different. Quality might vary throughout, but it''s a stunning little hardcover.
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Brenda Young
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
TWO ODDYSEYS AND TEN YEARS ON.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 6, 2013
The first two novels relate, separately, the adventures of two young American cowboys, each with a mission, journeying through Mexico before, during and after the Civil War. They suffer hardships and set-backs, resourcefully overcome; encounter generous help and...See more
The first two novels relate, separately, the adventures of two young American cowboys, each with a mission, journeying through Mexico before, during and after the Civil War. They suffer hardships and set-backs, resourcefully overcome; encounter generous help and hospitality, as well as great danger, violence and tragedy. The third book unites the two in what I think is the best of the three. The trilogy is a saga of courage, despair and triumph against adversity, interrupted by several excessively lengthy yarns by various strangers they meet, which the author uses as a vehicle for expounding various philosophies on life, but which are irrelevant to the story and don’t appear to progress it in any way. Dialogue is laconic, none too articulate, often humorous (and punctuated with much spitting and tooth-picking), while the narrative is often long-winded to the point of being boring. His descriptions are graphic and often poetic, the story strangely compelling, but some long tracts make heavy reading. McCarthy’s writing style is varied, ranging from acute brevity to excessive detail, in which he will never settle for two words if he can manage to squeeze in twenty. I was intensely irritated by his discourtesy to the reader by omitting apostrophes, hyphens and quotation marks (although one does get used to it), and am nonplussed by his consistent use of lower case initials for ‘ italian’,’jew’, ‘english’ and ‘french’, while honouring Spanish, American and Mexican with capital letters. Most irksome is the fact that a lot of the dialogue is in Spanish, for which only occasionally does he employ any of the usual devices for assisting understanding. Much of this I could fathom from a passing knowledge of other European languages, but the precise meanings of some long conversations were obscure, and required constant recourse to a Spanish dictionary, which was time-consuming and frustrating. Nevertheless, the saga is very moving, and leaves a strong impression.
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Sizzle
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too much Spanish & not enough punctuation..
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 2, 2021
This is actually a difficult read as the author not only writes key verbal exchanges in Spanish but also pays scant regard to the use of any punctuation other than the full stop. There are no quotation marks for dialogue & sentences often run in excess of 60 words without...See more
This is actually a difficult read as the author not only writes key verbal exchanges in Spanish but also pays scant regard to the use of any punctuation other than the full stop. There are no quotation marks for dialogue & sentences often run in excess of 60 words without so much as a comma. If all the Spanish conversation was grouped together, it would probably be over 60 pages worth. Too bad if you don''t speak the language! Having to frequently check & re-read parts of the book greatly diminished my enjoyment despite what is essentially very good material.
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varne
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A PRIVILEGE.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2015
I never re read books, life is too short. Except that I have read this [ and Suttree and Blood Meridian ] at least thrice. Brilliant,riveting stories/storytelling transport you to another place ; wonderfully drawn characterisation; beautiful prose poetry splurged & splashed...See more
I never re read books, life is too short. Except that I have read this [ and Suttree and Blood Meridian ] at least thrice. Brilliant,riveting stories/storytelling transport you to another place ; wonderfully drawn characterisation; beautiful prose poetry splurged & splashed onto the pages in great dollops ----- What more could you ask for ? The meaning of life ? That is, of course, central to all of Mr McCarthy''s works. The complete works of Cormac McCarthy would do very nicely on my desert island. Every time I finish one of his books I feel a strong sense of gratitude.
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Anna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic human struggle in the last century Wild West with pathos and gorgeous description
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 21, 2019
Ageless classic Wild West with humanity at the core. Like a travel blog with very concise dry witted dialogue ,some of which is in Spanish but very easy to pick up the inference. On my list of all time favourites . Not normally my choice of style - loved the writing.
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JASON
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poor writing style by the author
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 29, 2018
Can''t get on with the writing style used by the author. Rather than using correct grammar, the author chooses to use ''and'' every few words, making a sentence seem as though it were written by a child. It makes the story very difficult to follow.
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The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale

The Border popular Trilogy: All the Pretty Horses, online sale the Crossing, Cities of the Plain (Everyman's Library) online sale