A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

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Product Description

As seen on Good Morning America as a Summer Reads Pick

“One of the smartest, sharpest, and funniest books I’ve read in years... Some books are meant to be devoured—this one does the devouring.”—Emily Henry, #1 New York Times bestselling author of People We Meet on Vacation

One of Summer 2021''s Most Anticipated Novels
Good Morning America, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, theSkimm, E! Online, Oprah Daily, The New York Post, Woman''s Day, Parade, Bustle, Yahoo!, The Stripe, Popsugar, Medium, Lithub, Book Riot, The Nerd Daily, and more!

It’s a club like no other. Only the most important women receive an invitation. But one daring young reporter is about to infiltrate this female-run secret society, whose bewitching members are caught up in a dark and treacherous business. From the author of Happy and You Know It.

For years, rumors have swirled about an exclusive, women-only social club where the elite tastemakers of NYC meet. People in the know whisper all sorts of claims: Membership dues cost $1,000 a month. Last time Rihanna was in town, she stopped by and got her aura read. The women even handpicked the city''s first female mayor. But no one knows for sure. 

That is, until journalist Jillian Beckley decides she''s going to break into the club. With her career in freefall, Jillian needs a juicy scoop, and she has a personal interest in bringing these women down. But the deeper she gets into this new world—where billionaire "girlbosses" mingle with occult-obsessed Bohemians—the more Jillian learns that bad things happen to those who dare to question the club''s motives or giggle at its outlandish rituals.  

The select group of women who populate the club may be far more powerful than she ever imagined. 

And far more dangerous too.

Review

“Smart and witty.”
Woman’s Day

“A genre-bending tale perfect for readers who love romance, mystery and mysticism.”
Shelf Awareness

“This book is a wild ride.”
The Stripe

“Wickedly smart.”
PopSugar

“Fun, fresh and entirely worthwhile.”
BookPage

“A funny story of mean girls, society groups and possible witches.”
Parkersburg News and Sentinel

“The best kind of satire, taking real-life absurd ideas to their most logical—and sometimes scariest—extreme.”
Bitch Media

"Fans of clever, witty women’s fiction with some family matters and a touch of romance will appreciate this unique story."
Library Journal


“If you’ve harbored curiosity or skepticism about secret societies or clubs, “A Special Place for Women” by Laura Hankin will be right up your alley.”
Associated Press

“One of the smartest, sharpest, and funniest books I’ve read in years. A novel that will keep you on the knife’s edge between dread and delight, turning pages late into the night. Some books are meant to be devoured—this one does the devouring.”
Emily Henry, #1 New York Times bestselling author of People We Meet on Vacation

“This book has everything—intrigue, fun, wild twists and so much heart...I loved it.”
Ella Berman, author of The Comeback

“Whip-smart, acerbic, and absorbing...even more of a joy to read than her brilliant previous book.This one is not to be missed.”
Stephanie Wrobel, author of Darling Rose Gold

“Downright dangerous.”
Good Housekeeping

“Outrageously entertaining.”
The Nerd Daily

“Utterly addictive.”
Booklist

“A page-turning tale of ambition, power, and spirituality.”
Hannah Orenstein, author of Head Over Heels

"A story that will make you laugh, gasp and reconsider the depths of your own tote-bag feminism—from a writer so endlessly charming and witty, you can’t even be mad at her for it."
Megan Angelo, author of Followers

“Feminism, astrology, and politics merge in this funny, high-stakes story...hilarious, fast-paced, and so very original.”
Amy Poeppel, author of Small Admissions

"A smart, insightful novel about a secret female only social club. Laura Hankin delivers huge belly laughs alongside deep truths that will make you think long after finishing."
Brenda Janowitz, author of The Grace Kelly Dress

"Told with a rare blend of humor and insight, this is the perfect read for anyone who wants to escape and be entertained!”
Saumya Dave, author of Well-Behaved Indian Women

About the Author

Laura Hankin is the author of Happy & You Know It. She has written for publications like McSweeney''s and HuffPost, while her musical comedy has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and more. She splits her time between NYC, where she has performed off-Broadway, and Washington D.C., where she once fell off a treadmill twice in one day.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

One

 

Sometimes when you''re having the shittiest of days, you need to take one more tequila shot and splash some water on your face. Then, as absurd as it seems, you''ve got to go to a restaurant opening.

 

On one such shit day-the day that would end up setting everything in motion-I stood in front of a storefront lit with lanterns. In the window, my reflection wobbled, a disheveled figure in a corduroy miniskirt, dark curly hair all mussed from the windy September evening. That afternoon, I''d lost my job. The idea of hobnobbing in a crowd of loud, sparkling people made my stomach turn.

 

But I had to go inside. This was Raf''s opening. He was fancy now, profiled in Vanity Fair as the hot new celebrity chef on the scene, but he was also still the stringy boy down the block. After my parents divorced, when my mom needed a place for me to stay with free supervision until she got home from work, I''d spent multiple afternoons a week in Raf''s living room. Raf had always shared his Doritos and listened to me declaim the terrible poetry I''d written when I should''ve been paying attention in math class.

 

In and out, that was the plan. I threw my shoulders back and walked into the chatter, the sweet garlicky smells. Raf''s parents had grown up in Cuba before immigrating to the States together, and the press loved talking about how this fast-rising chef was reinventing the food of his roots with distinctly American twists. The breads were baked in-house. The meat came from a farm upstate where the animals were treated like family, until they were slaughtered.

 

I gave my name to a young woman at the door, and she scanned the clipboard in her hand, then waved me into the throng. There were two contingents in attendance-the older investor types, and then a smattering of New York''s privileged millennial crowd, who dropped by restaurant openings as casually as I dropped by my neighborhood bodega. Waiters carried trays of mojitos, or plantains speared with toothpicks. One of them offered me a miniature deconstructed Cubano, tiny and glistening with oil, like a sandwich for a doll. I popped it in my mouth, then paused to marvel at the taste of it. It was just so full of flavor, life bursting in my throat. I grabbed a mojito and took a long sip, scanning the room for Raf.

 

There he was, in a corner, wiry, tall, and tan, with a tattoo snaking up one arm, wearing a freaking baseball cap and T-shirt to his own opening. God, a woman could never get away with that, but if anything, it increased his appeal, judging by the gaggle of model-types jockeying for his attention. Raf was cute enough, but he wasn''t the kind of guy you''d stop to look at twice on the street. Now, though, he had status, so he could go home with any woman he chose. We all wanted to feel that we were special, and if a special guy wanted to sleep with us, that seemed close enough. I rolled my eyes at the machinations of the women around him (although I''d been that way too in my early to mid twenties, hadn''t I, jumping into bed with a visiting professor at my nonfiction graduate writing program and thinking that it made me unique). Then I walked toward him.

 

"Jillian!" he said, his eyes crinkling with relief to see a familiar face. He stepped away from the others and wrapped me in a bear hug. He was a little sweaty, uneasy at being the center of attention. "Oh, thank God, someone I know how to talk to."

 

"Hey, Raffie," I said into his chest, then held him at arm''s length. "Look at you, you''re such a big deal!" I leaned in and narrowed my eyes, all conspiratorial. "Tell me the truth, how much of a fuck boy are you being right now?"

 

His grin turned sheepish, and he tugged on his cap. "Not . . . you know . . . Maybe a little bit of one."

 

I laughed, or tried to anyway, and he looked at me. "Hey, you okay?"

 

Well, I wanted to say. You know how I had to put my career on hold to take care of my mom while she slowly died of cancer? And how I just came back to work full-time, ready to write the zeitgeist-capturing journalism I''d spent the last couple years dreaming about? Today, the billionaire who owned my news website shut us down because he''d rather use his money to buy a second yacht. So I''m not okay at all, actually.

 

Instead, I waved my hand through the air and took another long sip of my drink. "I''m golden," I said. The last time I''d seen Raf was at the funeral a couple months ago, when his family had sat with me in the pew. I''d sent my asshole father a few e-mails over the course of my mother''s illness to let him know what was happening to the woman he had once loved and left. But I hadn''t expected him to come back for her service, and he''d proven me right. Instead, the Morales family had stepped in as honorary relatives, providing casseroles and company. And during the years my mom was sick, Raf had regularly taken the subway all the way out to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, to rake her leaves and shovel her snow, even after I moved home and could have done it myself. No way in hell did he deserve to spend his restaurant opening listening to my problems.

 

"Besides, I''m not the important one right now," I said. "Don''t try to distract me from your amazing food."

 

"Really," he said, putting his hand on my arm, looking at me with such genuine concern it made a lump rise in my throat. "I know I''ve been MIA with the prep for the opening, but if you ever need anything, I''m here-" And for a moment the rest of the party fell away. It was just me and Raf on the couch in his living room, and I wanted to recite my misery to him like one of my old poems.

 

"So you''re Rafael Morales," a voice said, close behind me, pitched at a husky, thrilling tone. Raf and I both turned at the same time to see her: Margot Wilding.

 

She was all Edie Sedgwick eyes gazing out from under dark brown bangs, her hair falling-shaggy and curly-halfway down her back, her skin glowing and smooth and like she''d just spent the summer out in the sun. If she''d been born fifty years earlier, she might have been a muse with a tragic end, a beauty who flamed out too fast, immolated by the power of her unused ambition. But now she was a maverick in a floral-print jumpsuit. Behind her, she left a break in the crowd, as if the unique force of her energy had parted the waves of partygoers. God, how were such perfectly made people allowed out in the world? Didn''t they know that the rest of us had to be out here with them? It was rude.

 

I felt an urge to shut myself in a cabinet. It wasn''t that I hated my body. I just didn''t love it. I never quite knew how to move it gracefully, how to sit comfortably. Growing up, I''d longed to be one of those compact girls who got to make an adorable fuss about how they could never reach things on high shelves. But I''d just kept growing, not quite tall enough to be a model (also not pretty, thin, or interested enough), until I gave off the vibe of a grasshopper trying to masquerade as a human. My mother had once told me that when I stood still for a moment, I could be striking. But she was my mother, so she had to say that. All in all, my body and I were like coworkers. I appreciated when it performed well, I got annoyed about all the skills it lacked, and I didn''t want to have to see it on nights and weekends.

 

"I''ve been wanting to meet you," Margot said to Raf, staring up at him through her long eyelashes. She didn''t look at me-her world was filled with brighter things. "I haven''t eaten pork since I learned that pigs are smarter than dogs, and I''ve bragged about it to everyone, probably quite annoyingly. So you can''t tell anyone what I''m about to tell you. Do you promise?"

 

"I . . ." Raf blinked as she raised one of her thick, perfect eyebrows at him. "Sure, I promise."

 

She leaned in. "I just broke my rules for you, and it was worth it."

 

"Thank you . . ." Raf said, hesitating in the space where her name should have gone.

 

She laughed, delighted by his na•vetŽ. How fun, that he didn''t know who she was, didn''t realize that her mere presence at his opening could change his life.

 

"Oh, I''m Margot," she said to Raf, holding out her hand to shake his. Then she clocked that his hand was occupied, still pressed on my arm in its familiar way. And suddenly I mattered, at least a little, as a curiosity or maybe as competition. She fixed me in her gaze, a pleasant, faraway smile on her lips as the thoughts passed through her head: Was Raf dating this ordinary lump? What had I done to be worthy of his attention?

 

I stuck my hand out. "Jillian Beckley." My voice came out very loud, like a car honk. Sexy.

 

"Jillian Beckley," she repeated, and the way the name rolled around in her mouth made it seem special somehow. "Lovely to meet you."

 

She didn''t know it, but we''d crossed paths before.

 

 

ItÕd happened about a year ago, thanks to my editor, Miles. Ever since IÕd stepped back at the news website-Quill-to take care of my mom, Miles had been assigning me fluff pieces that I could do on my own time to justify keeping me on staff. Though Miles was an intellectual powerhouse destined for bigger things and he couldÕve gotten away with being a dick, he really looked out for his writers. Then, last September, heÕd texted me:

 

Beckley. You said your mom loves that mayoral candidate Nicole Woo-Martin, right? Nicole had knocked on our door one day, canvassing while I was out doing errands. I hadn''t even heard of her before that, but my mother had gushed about their conversation nonstop since. Miles kept typing. I''ve got two press passes for a gala where she''s giving the main speech. Want to come with? You can recount it all to your mom afterward and make her week.

 

I accepted immediately. Miles was so kind.

 

I''d assumed that the gala-for an organization encouraging more women to run for office-would be a typical nonprofit fund-raiser, filled with staid Upper East Side matrons, some nice hors d''oeuvres. But it was far more glamorous than that.

 

A beautiful woman floated past us, so close to me that her dress swished against my skin. I recognized her from Page Six, and nudged Miles. "Holy shit, Margot Wilding''s here? We''re in the presence of royalty. Hope she doesn''t realize we''re peasants."

 

"We might be worse than peasants," he said as we found our table. "We''re journalists. Did you see that interview where the reporter asked her about Nevertheless?" He pulled my chair out for me, speaking in a low, wry tone, a crooked smile flashing across his face. "I thought for a moment there that Margot might have her shot for her impertinence."

 

"What''s Nevertheless?" I asked.

 

"Ah," he said. He leaned forward and his voice got even softer. "Supposedly it''s a very secretive, very exclusive club for the elite millennial women of New York." As his breath tickled my ear, I shivered.

 

I''ve neglected to mention that, in addition to being so kind, Miles was also so dreamy. I''d noticed it in an abstract way before, but as we sat next to each other in our formalwear, the abstract became very real.

 

He went on. "Word is that they''re the influencers. Not the Instagram kind, who get paid to write about how much they adore certain brands. The real influencers: the puppeteers who pull all of our strings, whether we know it or not."

 

"Ah yes, my kind of people," I said, and he laughed. "Can''t wait to receive an invitation."

 

We were interrupted by a petite, red-haired woman at the microphone. "Hello, I''m Caroline Thompson," she said in a high-pitched voice, "and I''m the founder of Women Who Lead." She basked in the ensuing applause for a moment. "Now, it is the pleasure of my life to introduce the woman who I feel confident will be our next mayor, Nicole Woo-Martin!"

 

Nicole jogged onto the stage. She was a forty-one-year-old public defender from Brooklyn with no polish, no political pedigree, and no chance of winning against the establishment candidate. But as she waved to us, her fierce, unexpected charisma on full display, suddenly we were no longer at a fund-raiser. We were at a rock concert. "Hello!" she shouted, and the energy in the room turned electric.

 

As Nicole began to speak about why female leadership was so important, Miles and I grinned at each other. I snuck a glance around the room. Everyone leaned forward, as if Nicole were a magnet pulling us all in. Some of the women watching had tears in their eyes. Only one other person was looking at the audience instead of the speaker: Margot Wilding. Her lips curled into a strange, secretive smile.

 

As Nicole wrapped up her speech and the thunderous applause began, my phone vibrated with a text from my mother. How is it???? she''d written, the text accompanied by roughly a million emojis. (She''d gotten very into emojis.)

 

I showed it to Miles. "I think someone is excited that I''m here."

 

He smiled wide. "I''m glad." He nodded to where Nicole was shaking hands and posing for pictures as the applause continued. "I know we''re supposed to try to remain neutral, but she''s incredible, isn''t she?"

 

"She is. Thank you so much for bringing me."

 

"Of course. We miss you around the office," he replied. "I can''t wait for you to come back to writing full-time and blow everyone away." Suddenly I had a hard time meeting his eyes. Dammit, I was developing a very inconvenient crush. I turned back to watch Nicole, and Miles turned too. As he brought his hands up to clap for her, his ring flashed in the light.

 

Yes, in addition to being so kind and so dreamy, Miles was also so married.

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3.9 out of 53.9 out of 5
443 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Libriamo3116
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good!
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
Jillian is a down-on-her-luck journalist who needs a shiny new story if she''s going to keep her career going in New York City. She thinks she has a line on a good one, a hyper-secret, elite club called Nevertheless, where only women meet, and more rumors are circulated than... See more
Jillian is a down-on-her-luck journalist who needs a shiny new story if she''s going to keep her career going in New York City. She thinks she has a line on a good one, a hyper-secret, elite club called Nevertheless, where only women meet, and more rumors are circulated than truth is known. What is clear is that the women of Nevertheless have power, the dues are expensive, and this is the story that''s going to make or break Jillian''s career. It''s not enough for Jillian to be in the club, she has to get to the inner workings, where the real power and influence is, to see how deep the rabbit hole goes, and unveil it for the world. The more she digs, the more she discovers, and the more she discovers, and the closer she gets to the truth, the more she realizes she may be in for more than she bargained for. Jillian may have a story, but it might take everything she has to avoid becoming one.

The elite of New York City, women in the upper echelon, supporting each other as they make important decisions and climb the social ladder on their way to ultimate power? That seems to be the clarion call of this mysterious Nevertheless club, and Jillian''s determined to uncover the truth of it. I felt like Jillian''s motivations for going into this club to try to expose it were good, and I liked that I started feeling nervous along with Jillian as she started to find more odd stuff within it.

There are moments of feminism and positive aspects within the club at times, sure, but there''s a lot of shady stuff as well, and the women aren''t always out for each other either, as each of these women is powerful, and they all have their own ambitions. Then, a bit over halfway through, the story takes a sharp turn into a darker and, dare I say, a stranger path that puts Jillian on the defensive. Nevertheless, she persists, and finds out more about herself, and the club, than she ever imagined possible. I recommend A Special Place for Women for readers who want a taste of the brighter and darker shades of feminism, who want to laugh one moment and contemplate the next, and who appreciate stories that aren''t afraid of big reveals that change the course of a story.

3.5 ⭐
5 people found this helpful
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Cassie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fun, engaging send-up of NYC''s elite women''s club
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
I absolutely loved this book. It''s fun and easygoing but also offers a sharp critique of the faux-feminism of certain "women''s spaces" that really only serve a specific echelon of elite women. If you''re looking to get absorbed in an entertaining read with engaging... See more
I absolutely loved this book. It''s fun and easygoing but also offers a sharp critique of the faux-feminism of certain "women''s spaces" that really only serve a specific echelon of elite women. If you''re looking to get absorbed in an entertaining read with engaging characters and a mysterious twist thrown in, this is the book for you.
8 people found this helpful
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Elle G.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Totally Original and Unputdownable!
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2021
Review Snapshot : Laura Hankin pens a compulsively readable women’s fiction novel that centers around a secret society of women in NYC! Things get weird in the middle, but I LIVED for the weirdness that went on! So. Good! ︙︙︙︙︙︙︙︙︙ Ever since I read... See more
Review Snapshot : Laura Hankin pens a compulsively readable women’s fiction novel that centers around a secret society of women in NYC! Things get weird in the middle, but I LIVED for the weirdness that went on! So. Good!

︙︙︙︙︙︙︙︙︙

Ever since I read Happy and You Know It by Laura Hankin, I knew she would be an author I go back to over and over again. Her characters, while not the most likeable, are exactly as one would picture them; uptight and snotty elite women, women who think they are above everyone else because they are rich etc. Even though you don’t WANT to connect with people like them you can really help it because Laura shows that even though they are distasteful, they too have their own flaws that make them the way they are. It’s really quite amazing how she does this and it’s shown through both books. I think many of the women who I came to dislike in these novels actually redeemed themselves in some way- very cool!

Now, I don’t want to spoil this book because it truly IS an intriguing, unique, and EXCELLENT read, but I will say that the reviews are true. Thing DO get weird towards the middle of the book but it’s not something we don’t EXPECT. There are hints thrown throughout the first half of the book so we do know where it might be going, just not what is actually going to happen. I loved this A LOT.

That being said, I enjoyed this book immensely and never wanted to put it down. I picked it up whenever I could and sat for hours devouring the pages. If you want a book that’s a bit quirky and totally binge worthy then I highly recommend this one! I can’t wait for her next novel!
4 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best books I''ve read in years!
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2021
I love, love, LOVE this book! Laura Hankin is such a talented author, and this is my favorite book of hers yet! It''s the perfect blend of page-turning readability, humor, heart, cultural commentary, and uniqueness of concept. It''s like nothing I''ve ever read before, and I... See more
I love, love, LOVE this book! Laura Hankin is such a talented author, and this is my favorite book of hers yet! It''s the perfect blend of page-turning readability, humor, heart, cultural commentary, and uniqueness of concept. It''s like nothing I''ve ever read before, and I devoured it in a few sittings. The characters and setting are so perfectly fleshed out, and the world is instantly relatable to any woman who has encountered one too many decorative succulents along millennial pink walls and "woke" upper middle class 20something self-proclaimed witches. The twists and turns are so delicious and made me never want to stop reading. It''s one of those books that you''re sad to finish, because you just want it to keep going forever.
5 people found this helpful
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Ashley M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fun read! Unexpected twists! Definitely recommend!
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2021
I loved Happy and You Know It, so I was so excited for whatever came next for Laura Hankin. A Special Place for Women certainly did not disappoint! In this book, we get another look at the elite women of NYC, but in a very different way. In this book, the main character... See more
I loved Happy and You Know It, so I was so excited for whatever came next for Laura Hankin. A Special Place for Women certainly did not disappoint! In this book, we get another look at the elite women of NYC, but in a very different way. In this book, the main character Jillian tries to infiltrate a secret society for the chicest and wealthiest 20- and 30-something women of New York City, and she is certainly not ready for what she discovers.

This book has laughs, romance, twists, and heartstring pulls that will keep you turning the pages. If you are looking for a fun read that will take you on a unexpected journey and you love books set in NYC as much as I do, then this is the book for you! Also, you’re going to want to read it before the TV show comes out! I think this is going to translate so well into a series!
3 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My Kind of Crazy
Reviewed in the United States on June 3, 2021
A Special Place for Women manages to be snarky, heartwarming, and hilarious. I had been warned there was a twist, but everything that happened in this book felt exactly as it should. Some books have crazy things injected into them, while some just exist, nuts as they... See more
A Special Place for Women manages to be snarky, heartwarming, and hilarious.
I had been warned there was a twist, but everything that happened in this book felt exactly as it should. Some books have crazy things injected into them, while some just exist, nuts as they are. This book has a kind of mad energy that just makes it all the more readable.
I enjoyed this book so much more than I would have if I had sped through it, so I really recommend taking your time to read it and enjoy the observations about women and what we do to fit in.
This is the second book I have read by this author and the second I have really felt like I could give to a bunch of my friends who have nothing but reading in common.
2 people found this helpful
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Druscilla French
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Portrait of a Narcissist
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2021
Hard to imagine a more unsympathetic protagonist. This may be the worst book that I have ever read. She exploits others for her gain. Betrayal, lies, arson. All in her quiver of journalistic tools. Find something that inspires you rather than this example of narcissitic... See more
Hard to imagine a more unsympathetic protagonist. This may be the worst book that I have ever read. She exploits others for her gain. Betrayal, lies, arson. All in her quiver of journalistic tools. Find something that inspires you rather than this example of narcissitic self absorption.
3 people found this helpful
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Angie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Read!!
Reviewed in the United States on June 2, 2021
I enjoyed this book more than anything I''ve read in a long time - I couldn''t put it down until I was done. It''s the kind of book you get lost in and don''t want to end. It was funny, heartwarming, and mysterious all at once! I highly recommend this book if you''re looking for... See more
I enjoyed this book more than anything I''ve read in a long time - I couldn''t put it down until I was done. It''s the kind of book you get lost in and don''t want to end. It was funny, heartwarming, and mysterious all at once! I highly recommend this book if you''re looking for an entertaining read.
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Top reviews from other countries

Faith
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I gave this as a gift and hope to read it sometime.
Reviewed in Canada on July 15, 2021
I can’t review this ad I gave it as a gift.
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Product information

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale

A Special 2021 Place online for Women outlet sale